J.R.R. Tolkien is most famous for writing The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Among the many characters he created for Middle-earth were the Ents, giant talking trees that possessed the mental capabilities of humans. On Earth, there are only three humans who possess the bark-like skin of a tree. One of these individuals is 25-year-old Abul Bajandar.

Tree Man Bangladesh

 

The most famous Tree Man in the world is 43-year-old Dede Koswara, a resident of Indonesia.  His case was highlighted by the Discovery Channel in a show titled Treeman: Search For the Cure. The younger Abul has the exact same condition, which is technically known as Epidermodysplasia Verruciformis, but commonly referred to as ‘tree-man disease’. The disorder presents as a series of bark-like warts that grow on the hands, feet, and faces of the afflicted individuals. There is no known cure, and cases are so rare that scientists are still working to understand why the disease develops. So far, they know the condition results from an extreme sensitivity to human papillomaviruses (HPV).

Tree Man Bangladesh

While physicians continue to research the disorder, Abul and the other Treemen suffer extreme pain and discomfort. In the case of Bajandar, he began developing the warts over a decade ago. At first he was not concerned, but quickly realized this was a life-altering problem. When there were only a few bark-like warts, he tried to cut them off himself. The pain forced him to stop. Then, over the last four years, the warts covered his hands and feet.  He was forced to quit his job as a rickshaw driver in the Bangladesh province of Khulna. Soon, he could not feed himself. Now he is completely dependent on his 21-year-old wife and three-year-old daughter to help him perform basic tasks.

Tree Man Bangladesh

After becoming something of a celebrity, with thousands of people flocking to see him in his home village, the government decided to pay for his surgery. He was transferred to Dhaka Medical College Hospital where Samanta Lal Sen, a plastic surgeon, will begin burning off the warts with a laser. He cautions that Abul will need at least fifteen operations in order to remove all eleven pounds of warts that have sprouted up on his body. Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that the warts will not grow back after the surgery.

(source)

Pammy Lin

Pammy Lin

I'm a travel writer based in Washington state. I'm on the road over 200 days every year and have visited over 70 countries.