Health benefits come in many manifestations, but whoever would have thought that alternative healing methods could ever involve, of all things, a meat cleaver?

Believe it or not, in Chinese culture, even being tapped with the sharp edge of a cleaver on the flesh is said to benefit the skin and muscles and is thought to be relaxing!

In Hsinchu, northern Taiwan, the Huayuan Street night market is promoting what is referred to as the meat cleaver healing method.

If nothing else, this “therapy” attracts large numbers of observers in the same fashion as a spectacular circus act.

The treatment is simple and direct. The “doctor” holds a cleaver (sometimes two) and strikes the patient with the sharp edge.

Even the mayor of Hsinchu, Ming-tsai Hsu, tried the therapy while many looked on, horrified and fearful that a new election may arrive sooner than expected.

Hsu claimed to feel good after the treatment.

Others have stated that this technique leaves one feeling strange and is nowhere near as painful as the traditional practice of gua sha. In the latter procedure, the patient’s skin is scraped with a spoon or similar instrument. Oftentimes, moxibustion (AKA cupping) follows, in which local suction is applied, which is said to help the flow of blood.

The cost of each cleaver treatment, which lasts about 10 minutes, is about US$3.30.

However weird it may sound, cleaver treatment therapy is considered a form of legal alternative medicine.

Go figure and…watch out for those cleavers.

(Link)

MDeeDubroff

MDeeDubroff

M Dee Dubroff is the penname of this freelance writer and former teacher originally from Brooklyn, New York. A writer of ghostly and horror fiction, she has branched out into the world of humorous non fiction writing and maintains eight web sites covering a wide variety of topics. She also writes feature articles for several local newspapers. Her book entitled: A Taste of Funny, and her website, Eat, Drink And Really Be Merry (http://www.ingestandimbibe.com) feature many well researched and humorous articles on the subject of food and drink.