Why experience a traffic jam and all of its frustrations when you can pay someone else to do it for you?

Just because it’s your car and your journey doesn’t mean you don’t have other more pressing things to do and better ways to spend your time. Right?

So why not hire someone to fill in for you?

This has been the solution for many Chinese motorists who find themselves stuck in the never-ending maze of traffic.

Clever business entrepreneurs have come up with the ultimate lemons/lemonade agenda, and it is working to assuage tempers in the massive gridlock across the car-crazy land known as China.

The way it works is that anyone of China’s 1.3 billion car owners can now escape the encroaching horror of the traffic jam by calling for a substitute driver to take their cars to their destinations. Once the transfer is complete, the drivers are whisked away on the backs of motorcycles.

“The service is for those with urgent dates or business meetings to go to, and those who have flights to catch and can’t afford to wait in a traffic jam for too long,” says Huang Xizhong, whose company offers the service in the central city of Wuhan.

The service is also available in the eastern city of Jinan, where drivers can pay more than 400 yuan ($60) to escape a traffic jam. Other cities might willingly follow suit save for rules barring motorcycles on some of the nation’s freeways.

Beijing has the dubious honor of being tied with Mexico City for the worst traffic jams in the world.

Proxies for traffic jams are one way to deal with the problem and it’s pretty clever at that.

(Link)

MDeeDubroff

MDeeDubroff

M Dee Dubroff is the penname of this freelance writer and former teacher originally from Brooklyn, New York. A writer of ghostly and horror fiction, she has branched out into the world of humorous non fiction writing and maintains eight web sites covering a wide variety of topics. She also writes feature articles for several local newspapers. Her book entitled: A Taste of Funny, and her website, Eat, Drink And Really Be Merry (http://www.ingestandimbibe.com) feature many well researched and humorous articles on the subject of food and drink.