The Limits of Patience Tested by Miniature Origami

Posted on April 3, 2010

I once made an origami samurai hat. It took about fifteen tries, and I’m fairly certain I created expletives, but by Jove I finally created something. The fact that I used a step-by-step guide and pushed my patience to the brink notwithstanding, this accomplishment made me feel like a better person.

Then I saw the work of Mui-Ling Teh, and much like her creations, I instantly felt tiny.

The Limits of Patience Tested by Miniature Origami picture

Mui-Ling is an artist who specializes in origami, though with a few…modifications. Eschewing convention, Mui Ling uses paper that’s measured in millimeters, with the above piece, titled “Born From the Cell,” being made from a sheet of trace paper that measured a mere 3mm x 3mm.

Mui-Ling states on her website that she aims to present her miniature work in a creative scenario, and sets everything up by hand and without the aid of trick photography or computer enhancements. Although initially difficult to balance the tiny art on her hand and take a photo with the other, she states that “now I’m getting the hang of it; I suppose I can say my origami has also gotten me into photography. I do have a tripod now, although I don’t know if I’ll be investing into a new camera; I don’t really need one that badly.”

Currently a student in Canada getting her Master’s degree in architecture, Mui-Ling is an artist in other mediums, as well as a writer. Her work can be found at her website, as can an important note concerning the apparent misrepresentation of her words and work.

Do yourself a favor and check it out. You won’t be disappointed.

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5 comments
carmen
carmen

Go read her website. She takes herself way too seriously.

Jay
Jay

Useless really? I think stuff like this shows us how some things that we would consider impossible is infact achievable. The world would be a very boring place if we did not do things just because they where thought to be useless.

ioana
ioana

i agree with Jay. This is really something beautiful